See all three posts in this series

I had a discussion the other week with an investor colleague who had just bought a note at a discount.  That discussion got me thinking, and those thoughts became this week’s Money Blog entry.  I’ve changed the numbers to protect the innocent.  =)

This part seems simple, but it’s just the setup for a more intriguing set of questions to come.  Stay tuned!

Say I’ve bought a note for $20,000.  The amount owed is $74,947.52, the collateral is worth $200,000, and there are no other notes or encumbrances on the collateral.  I feel good about having bought the note, because it satisfies my happy/happy/happy criteria. 

The terms of the note are as follows: 30-year amortization on a $78,500 original balance, at 7% interest.


THE SCENARIO:

a) What’s the monthly payment on this note?

b) How many more payments are left in the note?

c) If the note continues to pay as-written, what’s the return on my amount invested?


THE SOLUTION:

a) N is 360, I/YR is 7, PV is $78,500, FV is 0.  Solving for PMT, I find that the monthly payment is $522.26.

b) I/YR is still 7, PV is $74,947.52, PMT is $522.26, and FV is 0.  Solving for N, I find that 312 payments are left.

c) N is still 312, PV is still $74,947.52, PMT is still $522,26, and FV is still 0.  Solving for I/YR, i find that the return on my investment is 31.33%.

 

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Money Blog – Turning one note into another, part 1
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